Educational Articles

  • Injuries to the eye and surrounding areas of the head and face are relatively common in horses and ponies due to their inquisitive nature and as a result of 'arguments' with each other and with structures such as stable doors, fence posts, trees, etc.

  • In pregnant mares, unlike most other animals, antibodies do not cross the placenta into the foal's blood stream before birth. Therefore, when a foal is born it has no natural defence mechanisms against infection because it has no antibodies, that are the blood's special immune proteins, with which to fight infection.

  • It is a well recognized saying 'no foot no horse'. Caring for your horse's feet and hooves and ensuring that he is attended to regularly by your farrier will safeguard his long term soundness.

  • Firocoxib is given by mouth and is used off label to treat pain and inflammation. Common side effects include mild decreased appetite or vomiting. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or other NSAIDs, in dogs less than 12.5 lbs (5.7 kg), or in dogs younger than 7 months old. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Horses and ponies often receive cuts and other wounds particularly on their face and legs. Many require just simple first aid measures, while others require the attention of your veterinarian.

  • Fish oil is an over-the-counter supplement, given by mouth, that is commonly used to treat a wide variety of inflammatory conditions. Give as directed by your veterinarian. Side effects are not common but may include vomiting, diarrhea, or a fishy odor. Do not use concurrently with anticoagulant medications. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Flunixin meglumine is given by mouth, injection, or applied directly to the skin and is used on and off label to treat pain and inflammation in a variety of species. Give as directed by your veterinarian. Side effects include swelling at the injection site, muscle stiffness, or sweating. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or other NSAIDs, in pets expecting to give birth within the next 2 days, or in birds. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • The expected birth of a foal from a favorite mare is an exciting but worrying time for many horse owners. Ideally, help and advice should be sought from your veterinarian or someone with experience in foaling mares, in good time before the event.

  • Folic acid is given by mouth or injection and is used to treat folic acid deficiencies due to intestinal or pancreatic disease, or due to the use of certain medications. Give as directed by your veterinarian. Side effects are not common but may include stomach upset. Do not use in pets with a known sensitivity. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Unfortunately, it is occasionally necessary to try to foster a foal onto a mare that is not its natural mother. This may be for any one of a number of reasons.

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